? the Tumblr

September 2, 2014 at 7:26am
21 notes
Reblogged from kingjamesprogramming

8:5 Why then is this people of Israel divided into two groups: those that do not use HTML, in order to provide local variables.

September 1, 2014 at 4:40pm
156 notes
Reblogged from ohnojackchick
Is this a re telling of Hansel and Gretel?

Is this a re telling of Hansel and Gretel?

(Source: ohnojackchick, via itswalky)

4:19pm
6 notes
Reblogged from bisexualusagi

bisexualusagi:

If you get the chance, definitely play P4. It’s animu Scooby Doo solving murders and having queer subtext fun.

oh i def will after i finish p3 dw! 

as for “queer subtext” ive actually heard that its a lot more like queerbaiting so? idk

It comes off more like “This is as far as we could get on a children’s program”.

August 31, 2014 at 11:49pm
19 notes
Reblogged from poppiseed

poppiseed:

I’M ONLY AN HOUR AND 30 MINUTES INTO THE NANOHA MOVIE AND I WANTED TO FINISH IT BEFORE POSTING ANYTHING BUT DUUUUUUUDE I JUST COULDN’T WAIT. HOLY SHIT. I’VE NEVER SEEN SO MUCH GLORIOUS DESTRUCTION IN A MAGICAL GIRL ANIME. I DIDN’T EXPECT THIS TO BE SO HARDCORE. I HAVE SCI-FI, MAGICAL GIRLS, AND ACTION IS ONE PLACE??? I AM BEYOND PLEASED.

WHY ARE MORE PEOPLE NOT WATCHING THIS????

(via primesonic)

August 30, 2014 at 7:29pm
975 notes
Reblogged from airyairyquitecontrary

Pocket Guide to some of the claims Tumblr blog medievalpoc IS and IS NOT making →

airyairyquitecontrary:

medievalpoc is NOT claiming:

  • that in mediaeval Europe, there were lots of people of colour everywhere
  • that perceptions of race have always been the same, everywhere
  • that fantasy and historical fiction and games should focus exclusively on people of colour, no white characters allowed any…

August 29, 2014 at 9:22am
44 notes
Reblogged from that-bishie-lambcelot

http://liquefied-dreamscape.tumblr.com/post/96051727282/vanquishedvaliant-that-bishie-lambcelot →

vanquishedvaliant:

that-bishie-lambcelot:

that-bishie-lambcelot:

that-bishie-lambcelot:

people who underestimate my undieing love for Nanoha Takemachi underestimate me

i will defend the queen bee of mahou shoujos till i die y’all think she’s something minor when…

August 27, 2014 at 4:36pm
19,078 notes
Reblogged from manicbotanic
manicbotanic:

I, for one, welcome our future Indian-Chinese lesbian cyborg president.

manicbotanic:

I, for one, welcome our future Indian-Chinese lesbian cyborg president.

(via obfuscobble)

August 26, 2014 at 10:08pm
313,354 notes
Reblogged from creepylittleworld

zacharielaughingalonewithsalad:

cellarspider:

twinkletwinkleyoulittlefuck:

purrsianstuck:

During the Bubonic Plague, doctors wore these bird-like masks to avoid becoming sick. They would fill the beaks with spices and rose petals, so they wouldn’t have to smell the rotting bodies. 

A theory during the Bubonic Plague was that the plague was caused by evil spirits. To scare the spirits away, the masks were intentionally designed to be creepy. 

Mission fucking accomplished

Okay so I love this but it doesn’t cover the half of why the design is awesome and actually borders on making sense.

It wasn’t just that they didn’t want to smell the infected and dead, they thought it was crucial to protecting themselves. They had no way of knowing about what actually caused the plague, and so one of the other theories was that the smell of the infected all by itself was evil and could transmit the plague. So not only would they fill their masks with aromatic herbs and flowers, they would also burn fires in public areas, so that the smell of the smoke would “clear the air”. This all related to the miasma theory of contagion, which was one of the major theories out there until the 19th century. And it makes sense, in a way. Plague victims smelled awful, and there’s a general correlation between horrible septic smells and getting horribly sick if you’re around what causes them for too long.

You can see now that we’ve got two different theories as to what caused the plague that were worked into the design. That’s because the whole thing was an attempt by the doctors to cover as many bases as they could think of, and we’re still not done.

The glass eyepieces. They were either darkened or red, not something you generally want to have to contend with when examining patients. But the plague might be spread by eye contact via the evil eye, so best to ward that off too.

The illustration shows a doctor holding a stick. This was an examination tool, that helped the doctors keep some distance between themselves and the infected. They already had gloves on, but the extra level of separation was apparently deemed necessary. You could even take a pulse with it. Or keep people the fuck away from you, which was apparently a documented use.

Finally, the robe. It’s not just to look fancy, the cloth was waxed, as were all of the rest of their clothes. What’s one of the properties of wax? Water-based fluids aren’t absorbed by it. This was the closest you could get to a sterile, fully protecting garment back then. Because at least one person along the line was smart enough to think “Gee, I’d really rather not have the stuff coming out of those weeping sores anywhere on my person”.

So between all of these there’s a real sense that a lot of real thought was put into making sure the doctors were protected, even if they couldn’t exactly be sure from what. They worked with what information they had. And frankly, it’s a great design given what was available! You limit exposure to aspirated liquids, limit exposure to contaminated liquids already present, you limit contact with the infected. You also don’t give fleas any really good place to hop onto. That’s actually useful.

Beyond that, there were contracts the doctors would sign before they even got near a patient. They were to be under quarantine themselves, they wouldn’t treat patients without a custodian monitoring them and helping when something had to be physically contacted, and they would not treat non-plague patients for the duration. There was an actual system in place by the time the plague doctors really became a thing to make sure they didn’t infect anyone either.

These guys were the product of the scientific process at work, and the scientific process made a bitchin’ proto-hazmat suit. And containment protocols!

reblogging for the sweet history lesson

(via ursulavernon)

1:39am
2,767 notes
Reblogged from likeitsstolen

reblog if you had a livejournal

edwardspoonhands:

crazyloststar:

REPRESENT

PSH! #diaryland

(Source: likeitsstolen)

August 25, 2014 at 11:09pm
7,807 notes
Reblogged from simhasanam-deactivated20140822

Languages animate objects by giving them names, making them noticeable when we might not otherwise be aware of them. Tuvan has a word iy (pronounced like the letter e), which indicates the short side of a hill.

I had never noticed that hills had a short side. But once I learned the word, I began to study the contours of hills, trying to identify the iy. It turns out that hills are asymmetrical, never perfectly conical, and indeed one of their sides tends to be steeper and shorter than the others.

If you are riding a horse, carrying firewood, or herding goats on foot, this is a highly salient concept. You never want to mount a hill from the iy side, as it takes more energy to ascend, and an iy descent is more treacherous as well. Once you know about the iy, you see it in every hill and identify it automatically, directing your horse, sheep, or footsteps accordingly.

This is a perfect example of how language adapts to local environment, by packaging knowledge into ecologically relevant bits. Once you know that there is an iy, you don’t really have to be told to notice it or avoid it. You just do. The language has taught you useful information in a covert fashion, without explicit instruction.

— K. David Harrison, The Last Speakers (via perugu—-annam)

(via airyairyquitecontrary)